Ways to Successfully Own a Classic Vintage Car

It is every common man’s dream to own a vehicle. These days owning a car is more of a necessity than a luxury. However, owning a classic car is a unique experience. A vintage car is definitely the owner’s pride and gives you a whole lot of benefit when you require selling the car. Just like any other investment there are a lot of problems that come along with buying a vintage car.

If you’ve decided to buy a classic car there are a lot of things that need your consideration, a few are discussed below.

Before you go ahead and invest in buying a car you need to thoroughly understand why exactly you would like to own the vehicle. It is advisable that you clearly understand your situation. A classic car even if it is in perfect condition might have issues such as squeaky tires. It is also common that the steering and brakes are completely different from the ones that you are used to. In comparison to the cars manufactured in the modern generation, these vintage cars are rough to handle and do not run smoothly. Deciding on choosing a classic car depends on whether the individual requires it for daily use, as a showpiece for to enter vintage car competitions.

Once you have come up with a purpose for purchasing a classic car, it is now time to decide the model and the type of car that you’d like to own.

Now that you have decided on the model the next step is to think about the problematic areas and issues faced with the model. You can start with looking for leakage issues or problems with the electrical circuits. Arrange for a thorough checkup to be done by a mechanic who works at an esteemed garage. It will also do you a lot of good by checking up the history of the car you wish to purchase. Look for information such as the original factory that it was manufactured in and the color of the car. It would also do you wonders if you learn to decode the vehicle identification number.

Choose an appraiser who is reputed- An experienced appraiser would easily be able to tell you about accidents that your car has undergone. They would also be able to identify if the parts are original or replaced. These tiny bits of information and details will help in valuing the classic car later on.

Tag along a family member or a friend when looking for a classic car. It is recommended to do this because you can get very tired when looking for a vintage vehicle. A lot of information needs to be collected and in the midst of doing so there is every possibility of losing out on very important information that you’ve collected already. A close friend can help you by remembering and keeping a tab of the information already collected.

With the advancement of the internet, one can easily look for classic cars online. You would even be able to find used auto parts for your car online since there are a lot of auto surplus store.

Vintage Cars – Something Very Vintage About It

Cars are one of the wonders of the world, and who possess vintage car know its real worth so they feel proud about owning it. Vintage means old models that were manufactured many years ago and are a fascination for the collectors. The cars of the period of 1919 to 1970s are considered vintage now a days. They are, also known as antique and classic, and they are categorised at various levels by enthusiasts according to their designs, manufacturing and styles. They create a sense of pride for the owners and they bring back the pre-retro times into the context of their life. These vehicles are combination of romance and beauty, attributed to many of their features. Although, finding a vintage car at an affordable price is very difficult and they carry a big price tag.

Most featured vintage car models:

· 1966 Shelby 427 Cobra: Well, the name is attached to Caroll Shelby and thus, the product has to be of prime quality. It has a maddening power to weight ratio making it one of the best vintage car. Extremely successful and has lot of nice features, Shelby was loved by the owners in the 60’s. This may cost you to the tune of $5.5 million.

· 1961 Jaguar E- Type: For a car lover, just watching this car standstill is a charm. With its attractive and insane looks, it is a favourite of the vintage car lovers. Adding to this, the word ‘Jaguar’ is enough to get your heads to go round when talking about cars. The brand value itself adds to your prestige. Enzo Ferrari referred to it as one of the most beautiful car ever made. The car received great fan following soon after its release in 1966. Vintage car lovers wish to own this car even today despite of its high cost.

· 1969 Maserati Ghibli 4.7: This is like dream come true to own this car. People say that it feels like a dream when you are driving this piece of gem, it gives a different feeling which no other car can. Despite stringent competition from various vintage cars, Maserati’s glory is just too damn high to ignore.

· 1965 Ashton Martin DB5: You ignore Ashton Martin when we are talking about vintage cars. Just the name gets you into the arena of the vintage world. James Bond enhanced its coolness and if it is cool for Bond, it is cool for us too. It is sure that if a vintage lover has to pick one car, Ashton Martin has every chance to be the winner.

The Aston Martin Virage Sports Car

Aston Martin Virage – A close look at this sports car including performance, technical data, features, comparing rivals, history, used prices

from Classic to Modern

THE CAR

The V8 Series of Aston Martin sports cars had been successfully produced since 1969, and a replacement was well overdue.

Consequently, in late 1988, and as a natural evolution, the successor was introduced at the Birmingham Motor Show as a 2+2 coupe, and designated the Aston Martin Virage sports car.

It was positioned as the company’s premier and exclusive model, and the timing of the launch coincided with the acquisition of the company by Ford of the US.

In terms of styling, it’s sleek lines, which produced a drag coefficient of just 0.34, resembled that of a Lagonda rather than the classic lines of the V8 Series.

It was fitted with spoilers both front and rear, and stylish flush headlights.

The influence of Ford was noticeable in the fact that, as a cost-cutting measure, a number of the car’s’ components were sourced from a wide range of companies, including the Parent.

Although it used aluminium body panels, it was still a heavy car with a curb weight of 1790 kg.

When production ended in 1995, Aston Martin had built a total of 365 Virage sports cars.

THE ENGINE

The Virage was powered by a front-engined, all aluminium, 5.3 litre, 32 valve, DOHC, V8 unit with the head modified by Callaway Engineering in the US, and incorporated a modified intake manifold and Weber-Marelli fuel injection.

This developed 330 bhp at 5300 rpm, and 350 ft/lbs of torque at 4000 rpm.

Fitted with a ZF five speed manual gearbox and using a 9.5:1 compression, it produced a top speed of 158 mph, with 0-60 mph in 6.5 secs.

Interestingly, the majority of customers preferred the optional Chrysler three-speed Torqueflite automatic transmission.

Towards the end of production, an optional six speed manual gearbox from the Vantage sports car was offered.

In January 1992, as part of a programme of improvements, existing customers were able to replace the original 5.3 litre engine with a 6.3 litre V8 unit that had been incorporated in the Aston Martin AMR1, a Group C sports car racer that was entered in the 1989 Le Mans 24 Hours race.

The new engine developed 500 bhp at 6000 rpm, and 480 ft/lbs of torque at 5800 revs, which gave the car a top speed of 175 mph.

The conversion included fitting larger vented disc brakes, 18 inch wheels, air dams and side air vents.

For Technical Data, see original article below

COMPETITION

Typical competitors of the Aston Martin Virage sports car were the following: Porsche 964 Turbo, and Ferrari 550 Maranello.

Aston Martin DB9 Convertible – A Driving Delight

The Aston Martin DB9 is a highly desirable and visually appealing drop-top grand tourer. Both the Coupe and Vol ante models are known for high performance and luxury that its maker is typically known for. From the previous model, both the variants underwent a style update for a freshened look and slightly revised interior and more powerful motor.

Though it had got some updates but the exterior facet including the classic proportions and graceful stance remained somewhat unchanged. However, several new details have been added to the latest convertible model, which were missing in the predecessor. For instance, the headlights are more angular and swept-back than before whereas the front fascia has received a streamlined single-intake design.
Talking to the styling, the DB9 Convertible is one of the most beautiful cars that a person can ever own. Despite a few amendments and upgrade, the model still carries off the classic Aston look with much ease. Though it has a classic exterior, it has a few modifications and improvements in the materials and texture to offer a more beautiful cabin that is exquisitely crafted and well finished.

The Vol ante model isn’t as stiff as the Coupe, but both the variants are a driver’s delight. It offers massive thrills with the added sensation of speed and wind as well as noise that a convertible allows. Also, the sound of 510bhp V12 bouncing off walls makes the driving more sensational. Whether Vol-ante or Coupe, some features are same – 0-62mph time of 4.6-seconds and the three-mode suspension. It turns in sharply and offers masses of grip to grant more control while driving. The carbon ceramic brakes are fitted as standard are excellent and has awesome stopping power. Even if there is a tiny bit of body shake, the vehicle is remarkably stable and offers a smooth ride.

The first models which sold in 2004 have been refined and honed with reliability improving all the while. The engine – 6.0-litre V12 – is well proven and used throughout the Aston range leaving no scope for bugs. Driver would not feel any problem with engine, transmission or drive line thus reliability is ensured. In terms of quality, the interior is well made to withstand the test of time. Both Coupe and Vol ante of DB9 Convertible have standard safety kit like airbags, traction and stability control as well as new front end to meet pedestrian safety legislation. In all of this, it maintains the traditional Aston front grille.

Top Tips to Minimise Your Service and Repair Bills

Owning a vehicle can be a costly venture. Not only do you need to plan for the initial purchase and rising cost of fuel but you will also need to plan for service and repair bills throughout the lifetime of the vehicle. While a regular Subaru car service schedule is important, it is possible to minimise the need for servicing and repair with some basic preventative measures.

1. Buy Fuel at a Reputable Service Station:

Many consumers have found that their vehicles suffer a drop in performance after buying fuel at certain service stations. This is likely because the garage has neglected basic maintenance changing the filters on each of the pumps. This allows particles of debris to be mixed with the fuel and enter into your engine. While your Subaru car service may include changing your fuel filter, you could have already suffered damage to your engine. It is far better to find a reputable garage who have a strict policy regarding their pump filters.

2. Discard Your Old Keys:

Many people develop a huge collection of keys on their key chain. While this appears to be a harmless habit, it can actually represent a great strain on your ignition. When you are driving, you could inadvertently be allowing a heavy weight to pull and bounce on the ignition. This can cause damage to the ignition tumblers and could lead to a switch failure. Go through your key chain and minimise the weight by discarding old keys. If you do need a large bunch of keys in your day to day life, consider having your car ignition key on a separate key chain.

3. Protect From Sun Damage:

The hot Australia climate can be devastating to the finish of your car. You should aim to protect your vehicle from sun damage by parking in shady areas where possible. This can protect your paint finish and your interior from sun bleaching. Additionally, you should use a rubber protect ant on all of the window and door weather stripping. This will keep the rubber supple and prevent cracking. Avoid using oil based products as oil can compromise the rubber. If you notice any damaged weather stripping, it is a good idea to replace it as soon as possible to prevent further damage occurring.

4. Seal Any Leaks:

Leaks are an indication of a potential problem with your vehicle. Most common leaks include radiator fluid. However, it is possible to reduce the need to replace a damaged radiator by sealing the leak. There are a number of radiator seal products available on the market which circulate around the radiator and plug any holes. This can prolong the lifespan of the radiator and reduce potential repair bills.

5. Check Your Fluids:

Many people have developed the good habit of regularly checking oil and water levels. However, while checking fluid levels are a component of a Subaru car service, they should not be neglected between garage visits. Fluid levels are easy to check and the brake, power steering, radiator fluid reservoirs have a minimum and maximum level indicated for ease of refilling. This enables even vehicle novices the ability to ensure that all fluids are at their optimum level.

If you are interested in learning more about vehicle servicing or need to arrange your Subaru car service, contact us. Our technicians are happy to answer any questions you may have.

Some Interesting Facts About Lamborghini

The technology behind each Lamborghini masterpiece is said to be a beast. From its unique aerodynamic features and looks, it comes to no surprise that most sports car enthusiasts prefer the exotic car brand. Almost everybody dreams of owning one.

If you’ve ever been to any place in the UAE, you’ll immediately notice their culture for luxury cars, including Lamborghinis. But there are many features to consider, like the most advanced safety options, entertainment technology, and customization.

Interesting Lamborghini Facts

Known for their exotic cars, Lamborghinis have been praised from the engine, to the body. It was first started to build better cars than Ferrari’s infamous vehicles. If you’re planning to buy your own Lambo, here are some interesting facts you should know.

1. Lamborghini was a master mechanic.

Most people consider Ferruccio Lamborghini as the original Tony Stark. He was stationed on an isolated island during WWII for the Italian Royal Air Force as a vehicle maintenance supervisor. Because it was difficult to secure parts, Lamborghini cobbled together scraps to keep his machines running.

2. The first Lamborghinis were tractors.

He used his WWII experience to put together tractors out of spare parts. From there, Lamborghini officially started his business, and people loved his products. Today, Lamborghini Trattori operates under a different company, but are still designed by the same firm that created the Gallardo and the Maserati MC12.

3. Ferrari’s mean customer service.

Ferruccio actually owned a Ferrari 250GT back in the days. He wanted a replacement for his clutch, so he went to the Maranello headquarters. After asking Enzo Ferrari, the reply he got was, “You’re just a silly tractor manufacturer, how could you possibly know anything about sports cars?” Four months later, he released Lamborghini 350GTV.

4. Current model with scissor doors.

Murcielago is the only current model with scissor doors. These rotate up and forward on a hinge, near the front of the door. The Countach, the Diablo and the Murcielago all have scissor doors, but the Gallardo does not. Both the Countach and the Diablo are no longer being produced.

5. No less than a V8 engine.

Most of the Lamborghini models throughout the history of the company have come with the legendary Lamborghini V12 engine. The newest model, Gallardo, only has V10. No Lamborghini have ever been produced with less than a V8 since production of the Silhouette stopped in 1989.

6. The fastest Lamborghini

The fastest Lamborghini is the Le Mans version of the Murcielago R-GT model. It has a top speed of 370 km/h. Meanwhile, the fastest street model from Lamborghini is the Murcielago LP640, which has an estimated top speed of 340 km/h. Both of the models have a V12 engine with more than 6000 cc.

Lamborghini Dubai Service Center

The Lamborghini line is divided into two segments, Gallardo and Murcielago. Maintenance ranges heavily based on what you select. Specialists recommend that you change the oil and oil filter every 7500 miles. The cost of new transmission could cost you 180-200K Dirhams.

If you can, bring your car to a Lamborghini Workshop service center regularly to minimize the risk of engine failure. If you need a replacement, you’ll be paying big bucks for parts so don’t take a chance. It’s best to deal with a company that understands how your Lambo works.

Adding A Rear Fog Light to The Open Road’s 1969 MGB Roadster

At the same time as changing the standard bulbs on our 1969 MGB Roadster to LEDS I thought it would be sensible to add a rear fog light to the MGB as these weren’t fitted back in 1969. Halfords have always sold a fog lamp that hangs from the rear bumper but I don’t like the look of this and wanted a less obtrusive one. Like all MGBs ours has a pair of rectangular reversing lights built into the rear panel. These are lit by 21W festoon bulbs (the same rating as fog lamps and brake lights) so my initial take was to trim a piece of red lens so that it fitted inside the clear reverse light lens and wire in a separate switch.

While technically this worked, the red light produced was only about the same brightness as a side light and not strong enough to work as a fog light. I then fitted a rectangular fog lamp from Halfords, which used a standard 21W bayonet bulb. This sat proud of the bodywork and ended up at too much of an angle and didn’t look right with its big black plastic surround. Searching the Internet I came across a company selling fog lights for trailers and they had an LED fog light about 80mm square with fixings 50mm apart, that was fairly flat.

One was duly ordered and it fits perfectly. It came fitted with two bolts which are slightly larger than the ones for the reversing lights. The light unit appeared to be sealed and I couldn’t get in to it to use the narrower bolts from the MGB’s reversing light so I just drilled out the captive nuts a little and used the washers and nuts supplied with the light. I made up a rubber gasket to stop rain leaking behind the light and getting into the boot. It is slightly larger than the reversing light but not much and looks almost like it was meant to be there. Also having LEDS rather than a normal bulb, it is very bright and should take very little current.

UK MOT testing rules for fog lamps say they must be wired in so they only come on when the headlamps are in use and they must have a ‘tell-tale’ light on the dashboard. Not wishing to drill two holes in the dash I found a chrome toggle switch at Maplin’s with a red LED built into the end. This wired in easily enough taking a feed off the headlamp circuit, running one lead to the fog lamp and another lead to earth. The chrome switch looks fairly period and the red LED is suitably obvious when switched on.

Overall an easy and worthwhile modification to an MGB Roadster that is used in all weathers.

Tony Merrygold of The Open Road is an expert in classic car hire having been in business in the UK since 1997 running The Open Road. Tony runs courses telling people how to start up a car hire company, having trained over 200 people over the past ten years.

Hints and Tips on Storing Your Classic Car Over the Winter

We don’t let our classic cars go out on hire in the depths of winter, particularly once the first frosts arrive and the councils start spreading salt on the roads. Our cars were never rustproofed when new and even though we tend to Waxoyl them ourselves this can never be done completely and always leaves untreated bodywork which is subject to the dreaded tin worm.

We take them all off the road over the winter and work through our list of improvements and put them all through our garage for their main annual service. Putting them away for the winter isn’t just a matter of driving them into the garage and we do, and recommend that classic car owners do, as much of the following as is practicable.

    • Clean and polish the whole car properly, including the underside of the bonnet and boot lids and as much of the engine bay as is reachable. Empty the boot and clean and polish the inside of the boot and the boot floor.
    • While you have the spare wheel out make sure it is clean and check the tyre pressure. As tyres can lose a bit of pressure over time when stored, pump it up to a few PSI more than is needed.
    • Hose down the underside of the car and dry it off as best as you can – if necessary taking it for a short drive to dry it off – as long as there is no salt on the roads of course.
    • Check the carpet to see if they are at all damp – most classics tend to leak to some extent. If possible lift the carpets and any soundproofing or underlay and check the floor isn’t wet. If it is, remove the carpets and dry and polish the floor. Hang the carpets and underlay up in the garage to dry, or store them in the airing cupboard if you are allowed to.
    • If you have over mats in the footwells it is a good idea to remove these to allow the main carpet to breathe. Store these somewhere where they will keep dry, or dry out if necessary.
    • If there was any damp inside the car at all this can creep up into the carpet that covers the gearbox and transmission tunnel or the carpet under the seats. Install a mini dehumidifier which will dry the car interior out slowly over a couple of weeks. These are not expensive – about £30 each and I have used them for over 15 years. They only consume about 40w so don’t cost much money to leave running continuously. They extract water and fill up a small tank which needs emptying when the light changes from green to red. Keep running the dehumidifier until no more water appears in the tank.
    • Store the car with the windows wound up otherwise the dehumidifier will be extracting moisture permanently as the air circulates round the car.
    • More importantly keeping the windows closed will stop your local rodents from deciding to make their winter home inside the car and chewing up the carpet and seats.
    • If you have the luxury of keeping your car stored in a Carcoon or an AirChamber then as long as the fans on this are kept running they will dry out the car both inside and out so an in car de-humidifier is not needed. We keep one of our cars in an AirChamber which works extremely well.
    • Check all under bonnet fluid levels: coolant – top up with antifreeze rather than water; oil; brake and clutch fluids and the battery electrolyte level.
    • Connect a trickle charger to the battery to keep it topped up. I prefer the ones that show a red LED while charging and a green LED when fully charged so the charge state can be seen at a glance. There are some premium priced chargers on the market for over £70 but I have normally bought suitable ones in the £20 to £30 price range which have worked perfectly. Some of these come with extra leads, with an inline plug, which can be fitted to the car so the charger can just be plugged in. I have fitted one of these to our MGB to save me having to lift the panel over the batteries to get to them. Alternatively connect the cigarette lighter direct to a live feed, not switched through the ignition, connect a cigarette plug to the charger and then it can just be plugged into the cigarette lighter.
    • Pump up tyres to a couple of PSI above the normal pressure to allow for any loss over the winter.
    • Do not use the handbrake in case it sticks on.
    • If your car is convertible, keep the soft-top raised and taut to keep it dry and free from mould.
  • If you have chrome wire wheels, clean them and give them a liberal coating of WD40. This can be cleaned off in the spring.

It is a good idea to start the car at least once a month during the winter and run it fully up to operating temperature. If possible, and salt hasn’t been used on the roads for a while, then take it for a short run. If this is not practical then at least drive it back and forth out of the garage to make sure the clutch works, none of the brakes have stuck on and at least get some of the oil and grease doing their jobs on moving parts. Also try all switches to make sure they work. Switch contacts can oxidise internally if not used and just switching them on and off will help prevent this.

And finally look forward to Spring, sunshine and no salt!

Tony Merrygold of The Open Road is an expert in classic car hire having been in business in the UK since 1997 running The Open Road.

The Importance Of Tightening Spokes On Wire Wheels On Classic Cars

I own a number of classic cars and have never really been a fan of wire wheels for a variety of reason. Firstly they take a lot of cleaning and it is very difficult to get between all the spokes and to clean the hub properly. Secondly and more importantly, spokes can work loose, or worse still they can actually crack or break under hard driving. I have never had a spoke snap on me, you really need to be doing some spirited rallying for them to fail, but I have had them work loose.

Over the years I have replaced the wire wheels on some of our cars (MGB Roadster, Triumph TR4a and Austin Healey) with Minilite alloy wheels and have D-Type alloy wheels on our Jaguar E-Type. These are easier to clean, no spokes to mess about with and they are actually easier for tyre companies to balance properly so normally make for a smoother, better ride. One of my latest acquisitions is a 1961 Jaguar Mk2 saloon which arrived with chrome wire wheels. Minilites would look out of place on a Jaguar and changing to standard steel wheels would involve replacing the hubs, and would look a bit plain and boring. So for now I am sticking with the wire wheels.

Cleaning the wheels recently, I noticed that a couple of the spokes were loose, and much credit to my local garage they also spotted this on the car’s annual MOT test, so I decided I needed to check all the spokes on all five wheels (including the spare).

This is a non-trivial task and can’t be done with the wheels on the car as you need to be able to get to both sides of the wheels to tighten the outer and inner spokes. First you need a spoke spanner, or at least a spanner the same size as the spoke nipples. The spokes themselves don’t tighten, they are held in place by the nipples and it is the nipples than need tightening. These are fitted though the steel wheel rim onto the spokes and the head of the nipple is therefore inside the wheel, touching the inflated inner tube. If you tighten the nipples with the tyre inflated it is quite likely they will pinch the tube and could puncture it.

The first thing to do is therefore to deflate the tyre almost fully. Then find the loose spoke(s) and tighten the nipple until the spoke no longer actually feels loose. Once the loose spoke(s) are tightened, you should then work round the whole wheel tightening up all the spoke nipples a little. Start at the valve and work round the outer spokes, and then turn the wheel over and work round the inner spokes. So you don’t overtighten any spokes, just tighten them a little and then work all the way round the wheel again giving them another little tweak.

Once all the spokes have been tightened you can re-inflate the wheel to the correct pressure, then refit to the car and move onto the next wheel. Completing all five wheels will probably take a couple of hours. Particularly if like me, you use the opportunity, of having the wheels off the car, to clean and polish them properly.

Job done. All spokes tightened and unlikely to work loose for at least another year. An afternoon of my life I’ll never get back.

Now I remember why I replaced the wire wheels on the other cars with alloy ones!

Tony Merrygold of The Open Road is an expert in classic car hire having been in business in the UK since 1997 running The Open Road. Tony runs courses telling people how to start up a car hire company, having trained over 200 people over the past ten years.

Combining his 20 year background in sales and marketing with his knowledge of the classic car hire industry, in early 2008 Tony launched a new web portal Classic Car Hire World – listing classic and sports car hire companies around the world. Within three months of its launch this site achieved a Google PageRank of 4/10 and was showing on the first page of Google.com when users searched for ‘classic car hire’.

Jaguar E-Type Driving Experience Days

The Jaguar e-type is a special car that is held dear by many, to understand why all you need do is analyse the statistics of this car. This car known as the e-type in the United Kingdom was called the XK-E in the North American market.

These days it is a legendary car, and a perfect choice for a driving experience, be it for yourself or as a gift for someone else. To understand why the e-type is such a good choice we need to understand why it took control of the market the way it did and why it has remained a much loved car to this day.

Manufactured from 1961 till 1975 this car was known for its beautiful aesthetics and addictive performance. It had a book 0-60 of 7.1 seconds but this was a cautious number and in reality most of the cars where faster than this, some even claiming to complete the dash in as little as 6.7 seconds, now that’s still a fast car even compared to cars on the market today.

Powered by a great throbbing straight 6 that came in either 3.8 or 4.2 litre spec. It was designed to be lightweight, giving much crisper handling and improved acceleration over its rivals of the time. It was also very competitively priced. If you can make your car more beautiful, faster and more nimble than your rivals you are already onto to a winner, Jaguar also made the car cheaper than its rivals, this ensured high sales figures.

It wasn’t just the beauty or the straight line speed that people fell in love with, it came in a very capable package that would handle like very few cars of the time, with a modern suspension and brake setup based on the earlier Le Mans 24hr winning car.

The e-type is a rare car these days, buying one in good conditions isn’t easy to achieve and if you manage to find one, its price tag will put it out of reach of most. Which is a shame for a car that was described by Enzo Ferrari as the most beautiful car ever made when it was released and Enzo knew a lot about cars.

If you can’t buy one of these (and if you did you would have to deal with the maintenance costs associated with an old classic British sports car) but still want to experience the drive of one, then you could attend a Jaguar e-type driving experience, you will have a tutorial and a chat with the instructor about the history of this fantastic car before getting your chance to take control of the wheel and push it as hard as you dare around a race track, this is the way this car was designed to be enjoyed, it was based on a Le Mans winning race car after all.