Some Interesting Facts About Lamborghini

The technology behind each Lamborghini masterpiece is said to be a beast. From its unique aerodynamic features and looks, it comes to no surprise that most sports car enthusiasts prefer the exotic car brand. Almost everybody dreams of owning one.

If you’ve ever been to any place in the UAE, you’ll immediately notice their culture for luxury cars, including Lamborghinis. But there are many features to consider, like the most advanced safety options, entertainment technology, and customization.

Interesting Lamborghini Facts

Known for their exotic cars, Lamborghinis have been praised from the engine, to the body. It was first started to build better cars than Ferrari’s infamous vehicles. If you’re planning to buy your own Lambo, here are some interesting facts you should know.

1. Lamborghini was a master mechanic.

Most people consider Ferruccio Lamborghini as the original Tony Stark. He was stationed on an isolated island during WWII for the Italian Royal Air Force as a vehicle maintenance supervisor. Because it was difficult to secure parts, Lamborghini cobbled together scraps to keep his machines running.

2. The first Lamborghinis were tractors.

He used his WWII experience to put together tractors out of spare parts. From there, Lamborghini officially started his business, and people loved his products. Today, Lamborghini Trattori operates under a different company, but are still designed by the same firm that created the Gallardo and the Maserati MC12.

3. Ferrari’s mean customer service.

Ferruccio actually owned a Ferrari 250GT back in the days. He wanted a replacement for his clutch, so he went to the Maranello headquarters. After asking Enzo Ferrari, the reply he got was, “You’re just a silly tractor manufacturer, how could you possibly know anything about sports cars?” Four months later, he released Lamborghini 350GTV.

4. Current model with scissor doors.

Murcielago is the only current model with scissor doors. These rotate up and forward on a hinge, near the front of the door. The Countach, the Diablo and the Murcielago all have scissor doors, but the Gallardo does not. Both the Countach and the Diablo are no longer being produced.

5. No less than a V8 engine.

Most of the Lamborghini models throughout the history of the company have come with the legendary Lamborghini V12 engine. The newest model, Gallardo, only has V10. No Lamborghini have ever been produced with less than a V8 since production of the Silhouette stopped in 1989.

6. The fastest Lamborghini

The fastest Lamborghini is the Le Mans version of the Murcielago R-GT model. It has a top speed of 370 km/h. Meanwhile, the fastest street model from Lamborghini is the Murcielago LP640, which has an estimated top speed of 340 km/h. Both of the models have a V12 engine with more than 6000 cc.

Lamborghini Dubai Service Center

The Lamborghini line is divided into two segments, Gallardo and Murcielago. Maintenance ranges heavily based on what you select. Specialists recommend that you change the oil and oil filter every 7500 miles. The cost of new transmission could cost you 180-200K Dirhams.

If you can, bring your car to a Lamborghini Workshop service center regularly to minimize the risk of engine failure. If you need a replacement, you’ll be paying big bucks for parts so don’t take a chance. It’s best to deal with a company that understands how your Lambo works.

Adding A Rear Fog Light to The Open Road’s 1969 MGB Roadster

At the same time as changing the standard bulbs on our 1969 MGB Roadster to LEDS I thought it would be sensible to add a rear fog light to the MGB as these weren’t fitted back in 1969. Halfords have always sold a fog lamp that hangs from the rear bumper but I don’t like the look of this and wanted a less obtrusive one. Like all MGBs ours has a pair of rectangular reversing lights built into the rear panel. These are lit by 21W festoon bulbs (the same rating as fog lamps and brake lights) so my initial take was to trim a piece of red lens so that it fitted inside the clear reverse light lens and wire in a separate switch.

While technically this worked, the red light produced was only about the same brightness as a side light and not strong enough to work as a fog light. I then fitted a rectangular fog lamp from Halfords, which used a standard 21W bayonet bulb. This sat proud of the bodywork and ended up at too much of an angle and didn’t look right with its big black plastic surround. Searching the Internet I came across a company selling fog lights for trailers and they had an LED fog light about 80mm square with fixings 50mm apart, that was fairly flat.

One was duly ordered and it fits perfectly. It came fitted with two bolts which are slightly larger than the ones for the reversing lights. The light unit appeared to be sealed and I couldn’t get in to it to use the narrower bolts from the MGB’s reversing light so I just drilled out the captive nuts a little and used the washers and nuts supplied with the light. I made up a rubber gasket to stop rain leaking behind the light and getting into the boot. It is slightly larger than the reversing light but not much and looks almost like it was meant to be there. Also having LEDS rather than a normal bulb, it is very bright and should take very little current.

UK MOT testing rules for fog lamps say they must be wired in so they only come on when the headlamps are in use and they must have a ‘tell-tale’ light on the dashboard. Not wishing to drill two holes in the dash I found a chrome toggle switch at Maplin’s with a red LED built into the end. This wired in easily enough taking a feed off the headlamp circuit, running one lead to the fog lamp and another lead to earth. The chrome switch looks fairly period and the red LED is suitably obvious when switched on.

Overall an easy and worthwhile modification to an MGB Roadster that is used in all weathers.

Tony Merrygold of The Open Road is an expert in classic car hire having been in business in the UK since 1997 running The Open Road. Tony runs courses telling people how to start up a car hire company, having trained over 200 people over the past ten years.

Hints and Tips on Storing Your Classic Car Over the Winter

We don’t let our classic cars go out on hire in the depths of winter, particularly once the first frosts arrive and the councils start spreading salt on the roads. Our cars were never rustproofed when new and even though we tend to Waxoyl them ourselves this can never be done completely and always leaves untreated bodywork which is subject to the dreaded tin worm.

We take them all off the road over the winter and work through our list of improvements and put them all through our garage for their main annual service. Putting them away for the winter isn’t just a matter of driving them into the garage and we do, and recommend that classic car owners do, as much of the following as is practicable.

    • Clean and polish the whole car properly, including the underside of the bonnet and boot lids and as much of the engine bay as is reachable. Empty the boot and clean and polish the inside of the boot and the boot floor.
    • While you have the spare wheel out make sure it is clean and check the tyre pressure. As tyres can lose a bit of pressure over time when stored, pump it up to a few PSI more than is needed.
    • Hose down the underside of the car and dry it off as best as you can – if necessary taking it for a short drive to dry it off – as long as there is no salt on the roads of course.
    • Check the carpet to see if they are at all damp – most classics tend to leak to some extent. If possible lift the carpets and any soundproofing or underlay and check the floor isn’t wet. If it is, remove the carpets and dry and polish the floor. Hang the carpets and underlay up in the garage to dry, or store them in the airing cupboard if you are allowed to.
    • If you have over mats in the footwells it is a good idea to remove these to allow the main carpet to breathe. Store these somewhere where they will keep dry, or dry out if necessary.
    • If there was any damp inside the car at all this can creep up into the carpet that covers the gearbox and transmission tunnel or the carpet under the seats. Install a mini dehumidifier which will dry the car interior out slowly over a couple of weeks. These are not expensive – about £30 each and I have used them for over 15 years. They only consume about 40w so don’t cost much money to leave running continuously. They extract water and fill up a small tank which needs emptying when the light changes from green to red. Keep running the dehumidifier until no more water appears in the tank.
    • Store the car with the windows wound up otherwise the dehumidifier will be extracting moisture permanently as the air circulates round the car.
    • More importantly keeping the windows closed will stop your local rodents from deciding to make their winter home inside the car and chewing up the carpet and seats.
    • If you have the luxury of keeping your car stored in a Carcoon or an AirChamber then as long as the fans on this are kept running they will dry out the car both inside and out so an in car de-humidifier is not needed. We keep one of our cars in an AirChamber which works extremely well.
    • Check all under bonnet fluid levels: coolant – top up with antifreeze rather than water; oil; brake and clutch fluids and the battery electrolyte level.
    • Connect a trickle charger to the battery to keep it topped up. I prefer the ones that show a red LED while charging and a green LED when fully charged so the charge state can be seen at a glance. There are some premium priced chargers on the market for over £70 but I have normally bought suitable ones in the £20 to £30 price range which have worked perfectly. Some of these come with extra leads, with an inline plug, which can be fitted to the car so the charger can just be plugged in. I have fitted one of these to our MGB to save me having to lift the panel over the batteries to get to them. Alternatively connect the cigarette lighter direct to a live feed, not switched through the ignition, connect a cigarette plug to the charger and then it can just be plugged into the cigarette lighter.
    • Pump up tyres to a couple of PSI above the normal pressure to allow for any loss over the winter.
    • Do not use the handbrake in case it sticks on.
    • If your car is convertible, keep the soft-top raised and taut to keep it dry and free from mould.
  • If you have chrome wire wheels, clean them and give them a liberal coating of WD40. This can be cleaned off in the spring.

It is a good idea to start the car at least once a month during the winter and run it fully up to operating temperature. If possible, and salt hasn’t been used on the roads for a while, then take it for a short run. If this is not practical then at least drive it back and forth out of the garage to make sure the clutch works, none of the brakes have stuck on and at least get some of the oil and grease doing their jobs on moving parts. Also try all switches to make sure they work. Switch contacts can oxidise internally if not used and just switching them on and off will help prevent this.

And finally look forward to Spring, sunshine and no salt!

Tony Merrygold of The Open Road is an expert in classic car hire having been in business in the UK since 1997 running The Open Road.

The Importance Of Tightening Spokes On Wire Wheels On Classic Cars

I own a number of classic cars and have never really been a fan of wire wheels for a variety of reason. Firstly they take a lot of cleaning and it is very difficult to get between all the spokes and to clean the hub properly. Secondly and more importantly, spokes can work loose, or worse still they can actually crack or break under hard driving. I have never had a spoke snap on me, you really need to be doing some spirited rallying for them to fail, but I have had them work loose.

Over the years I have replaced the wire wheels on some of our cars (MGB Roadster, Triumph TR4a and Austin Healey) with Minilite alloy wheels and have D-Type alloy wheels on our Jaguar E-Type. These are easier to clean, no spokes to mess about with and they are actually easier for tyre companies to balance properly so normally make for a smoother, better ride. One of my latest acquisitions is a 1961 Jaguar Mk2 saloon which arrived with chrome wire wheels. Minilites would look out of place on a Jaguar and changing to standard steel wheels would involve replacing the hubs, and would look a bit plain and boring. So for now I am sticking with the wire wheels.

Cleaning the wheels recently, I noticed that a couple of the spokes were loose, and much credit to my local garage they also spotted this on the car’s annual MOT test, so I decided I needed to check all the spokes on all five wheels (including the spare).

This is a non-trivial task and can’t be done with the wheels on the car as you need to be able to get to both sides of the wheels to tighten the outer and inner spokes. First you need a spoke spanner, or at least a spanner the same size as the spoke nipples. The spokes themselves don’t tighten, they are held in place by the nipples and it is the nipples than need tightening. These are fitted though the steel wheel rim onto the spokes and the head of the nipple is therefore inside the wheel, touching the inflated inner tube. If you tighten the nipples with the tyre inflated it is quite likely they will pinch the tube and could puncture it.

The first thing to do is therefore to deflate the tyre almost fully. Then find the loose spoke(s) and tighten the nipple until the spoke no longer actually feels loose. Once the loose spoke(s) are tightened, you should then work round the whole wheel tightening up all the spoke nipples a little. Start at the valve and work round the outer spokes, and then turn the wheel over and work round the inner spokes. So you don’t overtighten any spokes, just tighten them a little and then work all the way round the wheel again giving them another little tweak.

Once all the spokes have been tightened you can re-inflate the wheel to the correct pressure, then refit to the car and move onto the next wheel. Completing all five wheels will probably take a couple of hours. Particularly if like me, you use the opportunity, of having the wheels off the car, to clean and polish them properly.

Job done. All spokes tightened and unlikely to work loose for at least another year. An afternoon of my life I’ll never get back.

Now I remember why I replaced the wire wheels on the other cars with alloy ones!

Tony Merrygold of The Open Road is an expert in classic car hire having been in business in the UK since 1997 running The Open Road. Tony runs courses telling people how to start up a car hire company, having trained over 200 people over the past ten years.

Combining his 20 year background in sales and marketing with his knowledge of the classic car hire industry, in early 2008 Tony launched a new web portal Classic Car Hire World – listing classic and sports car hire companies around the world. Within three months of its launch this site achieved a Google PageRank of 4/10 and was showing on the first page of Google.com when users searched for ‘classic car hire’.

Jaguar E-Type Driving Experience Days

The Jaguar e-type is a special car that is held dear by many, to understand why all you need do is analyse the statistics of this car. This car known as the e-type in the United Kingdom was called the XK-E in the North American market.

These days it is a legendary car, and a perfect choice for a driving experience, be it for yourself or as a gift for someone else. To understand why the e-type is such a good choice we need to understand why it took control of the market the way it did and why it has remained a much loved car to this day.

Manufactured from 1961 till 1975 this car was known for its beautiful aesthetics and addictive performance. It had a book 0-60 of 7.1 seconds but this was a cautious number and in reality most of the cars where faster than this, some even claiming to complete the dash in as little as 6.7 seconds, now that’s still a fast car even compared to cars on the market today.

Powered by a great throbbing straight 6 that came in either 3.8 or 4.2 litre spec. It was designed to be lightweight, giving much crisper handling and improved acceleration over its rivals of the time. It was also very competitively priced. If you can make your car more beautiful, faster and more nimble than your rivals you are already onto to a winner, Jaguar also made the car cheaper than its rivals, this ensured high sales figures.

It wasn’t just the beauty or the straight line speed that people fell in love with, it came in a very capable package that would handle like very few cars of the time, with a modern suspension and brake setup based on the earlier Le Mans 24hr winning car.

The e-type is a rare car these days, buying one in good conditions isn’t easy to achieve and if you manage to find one, its price tag will put it out of reach of most. Which is a shame for a car that was described by Enzo Ferrari as the most beautiful car ever made when it was released and Enzo knew a lot about cars.

If you can’t buy one of these (and if you did you would have to deal with the maintenance costs associated with an old classic British sports car) but still want to experience the drive of one, then you could attend a Jaguar e-type driving experience, you will have a tutorial and a chat with the instructor about the history of this fantastic car before getting your chance to take control of the wheel and push it as hard as you dare around a race track, this is the way this car was designed to be enjoyed, it was based on a Le Mans winning race car after all.

The Mercedes Tuning – What Are The Reasons To Tune Your Vehicle?

We are very well aware of the shooting fuel prices in the market. Hence, it is crucial to tune your Mercedes, so that it delivers great mpg. There are many reasons of the Mercedes tuning like better acceleration, enhanced torque, great economy, more power, healthier engine etc.

We have seen rapid growth in the technology in the field of automobiles. The super chip tuning technology is developed especially for the premium cars like Mercedes. The tuning is efficient for both the petrol and diesel version of car. It will ensure that your car gives best performance without any hassle.

Importance of tuning

Once the vehicle is tuned, it will reduce the emission and improve the performance by 15%. It is quite obvious that tuning will help your vehicle in multiple ways. However, you must tune the vehicle timely to avoid any inconvenience. The experts recommend visiting to the mechanic once in three months. The professionals will make sure that none of the part needs repairing.

As the fuel prices have increased, so does the dependency on vehicles. It is crucial to keep your car in good shape. If you maintain the car properly, then the car will run efficiently for long years without any hassle. Else, it would require regular repairing that will ultimately lead to lower mpg and reduce the performance.

What to consider while tuning the exhaust system?

The exhaust system of the Mercedes includes a front pipe, exhaust manifold, catalyst converter, silencer, exhaust tip and tail pipe. While tuning the system, muffler is the easiest to deal. The professionals will replace the stock muffler with high performance muffler.

As a result, you will get a free flow exhaust system. You must keep in mind that the inlet and outlet pipe of the muffler is of the same size as front and tail pipe. Check out the diameter of tail and front pipe. They must have same dimensions for better performance. Other terms of the exhaust system is a little complicated to understand. You must have knowledge of the engine’s power band, exhaust back pressure and usable RPM.

If excessive pressure is produced by the system, then it will have a negative impact on the performance of the engine. This will restrict the flow of exhaust gases. As a result, the engine will be inefficient to expel exhaust gases. Ultimately, it would lead to much reduced engine power.

Dos and the don’ts

Make sure that you never attach pea-shooter instead of the exhaust system to the engine. You must also not install a 10 inch wastewater pipe. In case the exhaust pipe is big enough, then it will lead to much reduced flow velocity of the gases. You have to keep in mind to get the exhaust back pressure perfect.

While tuning the exhaust system, the professionals aim to increase the power of the engine by the right exhaust tuning.

In order to get the best Mercedes tuning, you could prefer the paramount-performance. The well qualified team of experts has great experience in this field. Not only this, they have brilliant past records, which makes it even more convincing to deal with them.

Upgrading the Radiator and Cooling Fan on a 1969 MGB Roadster

In all the 18+ years of ownership of our 1969 MGB Roadster it has never overheated, but a minor leak from the radiator in 2016 necessitated its change so I decided it was the right time to upgrade the cooling system in preparation for the next 18 years.

While checking on prices for a new radiator I came across a company in The Netherlands offering an aluminium radiator for not much more than a standard one, so ordering was a no brainer. Fortunately I ordered this about one month before the British voted to leave the EU and the Pound plummeted against the Euro.

As the whole cooling system had to come apart I thought I would also replace the engine driven radiator fan with an electric one. I have fitted Kenlowe fans to my cars in the past and while they worked perfectly well I had two issues with them. Firstly fitting with their universal fitting kit was never that accurate and always looked a bit untidy and secondly the sensor was an odd bulb arrangement which fitted in the head of the radiator and slotted into an extra seal, which I found difficult to make watertight.

This time I opted for a Revotec fan as it fixed both these problems. Each fan comes with a laser cut aluminium frame which fits onto long bolts in place of the normal ones and the sensor is embedded into a special section of aluminium tube which along with two short hoses replaces the normal convoluted top hose. The Revotec came complete with a good set of instructions and all necessary wires, connectors, and even a set of cable ties to tidy up the wiring.

Inevitably my work involved in replacing the cooling system doesn’t stop there as while this was removed from the engine compartment I cleaned it up as much as possible. The radiator surround and expansion tank, I had previously fitted, were removed and painted with black Smoothrite and the water pump hub in yellow. The inner wings were cleaned, a few areas touched in and all polished. I replaced the lower radiator hose, crankcase breather and oil cooler grommets at the same time while I had easy access.

Everything was installed relatively smoothly and with no problems. I wired in the fan and controller loosely to make sure everything worked properly, before I committed to cutting the wires to size and fixing it as tidily as possible.

The MGB all fired up first time and amazingly there were no leaks from anywhere. The controller worked well and after allowing the engine to heat up and the fan cut in OK. It took a few cycles to set it at about the right operating temperature. A good road test in varied conditions also proved successful, still without leaking. The Revotec works really well generating a huge airflow which cools the radiator very quickly and cuts in and out smoothly. My only criticism of Revotec is that nowhere in the instructions did it say what ampage fuse was needed to the fan supply. A quick Google search found this on the Revotec website. So why on earth don’t they include it in the printed instructions?

In theory removing the engine driven fan should also release a few extra bhp but no-one ever said how much. But as the MGB was originally only 95 bhp, and presumably over the years this has dropped a bit, even only a few bhp could make a 5% difference although there wasn’t any noticeable difference during my road test.

The new aluminium radiator and Revotec fan should serve the car well for a long time and it gave me the excuse to clean up the engine bay.